Self care for chronic depletion: Mindfulness

photo credit: https://pixabay.com/photos/yoga-outdoor-woman-pose-young-2176668/

This is the first in a series of 4 posts about self care for chronically depleted individuals.

Receiving CranioSacral Therapy is one road for building resilience when you are depleted. The benefits of regular CranioSacral sessions will be extended when the client undertakes self care between sessions. One way that state of calm that happens during a session can be extended, is through mindfulness meditation.

The ability to focus one’s mind, as in a practice like mindfulness meditation, is associated with greater feelings of peace, relaxation, meaning, purpose, and emotional and mental health. A regular mindfulness practice can help one respond, not react, and feel more in control of their emotions. https://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2015/02/09/7-ways-meditation-can-actually-change-the-brain/#4afd26371465

There are so many resources out there for meditation. I will list some reputable sources, but at the end of the article I will include a framework for you to follow, no smart phone apps or classes are necessary to just get started.

Apps or online resources:

https://www.tenpercent.com. (This is the app I use and I really like the variety of meditations available. There are beginner courses if you are new to mindfulness.) Paid subscription

https://www.headspace.com Paid subscription

https://www.calm.com Paid subscription

https://www.uclahealth.org/marc/mindful-meditations Free!

Local classes:

https://www.bloomingtoncenterformindfulness.com

Mindfulness:

Find a comfortable seated position that you can hold for 10 minutes. Find a single focus for your meditation. Common suggestions might be one of the following:

-The sensation of air passing through your nostrils

-The physical sensation of your chest expanding and contracting during your breath

-Counting your breaths

Choose only one of the suggestions and stir with it for the full 10 minutes. Notice when your awareness shifts away from your focus and then gently bring your mind back. Be gentle on yourself when you catch your mind wandering and when bringing yourself back to your focus. Noticing your distraction IS mindfulness.

Do this twice a day. After 1 month, increase your time to 15 minutes.

Meditation can seem intimidating if you’ve never tried it. If you have and felt like you were failing because of the monkey chatter in your brain, you are not alone. Straying thoughts are completely normal! No one is a seasoned, mind like a steel trap yogi, when they begin. Be easy on yourself.

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